Jack london to build a fire questions and answers. Build a by Jack London 2019-01-08

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Knowledge or Instinct? Jack London's “To Build a Fire”

jack london to build a fire questions and answers

He was a bit frightened. He tried to pick it out of the snow, but failed. Something was the matter, and its suspicious nature sensed danger,--it knew not what danger but somewhere, somehow, in its brain arose an apprehension of the man. This fell on the boughs beneath, capsizing them. What would be different if the story's narrator only related the man's point-of-view? But before he could cut the strings, it happened. How does this comment play out in the story? It was a clear day, and yet there seemed an intangible pall over the face of things, a subtle gloom that made the day dark, and that was due to the absence of sun. He sat down in the snow, and in this fashion held the dog, while it snarled and whined and struggled.

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To Build a Fire Part I Summary and Analysis

jack london to build a fire questions and answers

What are some key differences in their attitudes towards nature and their knowledge of nature? Empty as the man's mind was of thoughts, he was keenly observant, and he noticed the changes in the creek, the curves and bends and timber- jams, and always he sharply noted where he placed his feet. The faint tingling grew stronger till it evolved into a stinging ache that was excruciating, but which the man hailed with satisfaction. The man is in no condition to battle the forces of nature any further. He is also startled at how fast his nose and cheeks freeze, and he is amazed when his spittle freezes in midair before it ever hits the snow. As the two travel, the journey becomes more difficult than the man originally believed. We see other processes in effect, too, such as the layers of snow and ice that have built up in the Yukon, or the ice that accumulates on the man's beard. He plunged in among the big spruce trees.


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Summarize 'To Build a Fire' by Jack London.

jack london to build a fire questions and answers

Then he could build another fire. Thank you so much for providing us great resources. There was no sun nor hint of sun, though there was not a cloud in the sky. The snow from the Spruce tree branches falls and puts out the fire. He did not expose his fingers more than a minute, and was astonished at the swift numbness that smote them. Undoubtedly it was colder than fifty below--how much colder he did not know.


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To Build a Fire

jack london to build a fire questions and answers

The creek he knew was frozen clear to the bottom--no creek could contain water in that arctic winter--but he knew also that there were springs that bubbled out from the hillsides and ran along under the snow and on top the ice of the creek. The sensation developed into pain that grew acute. He had felt the give under his feet and heard the crackle of a snow-hidden ice-skin. He began threshing his arms back and forth, beating the mittened hands against his sides. The old-timer knows how cold 75 degrees below zero is. While the main conflict is man versus nature, it would be inaccurate to say that nature actively assaults the man. It is extremely well organized, efficient and cost-effective.

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To Build a Fire Questions

jack london to build a fire questions and answers

This thought he kept in the background and refused to consider. If he had only had a trail-mate he would have been in no danger now. Such fact impressed him as being cold and uncomfortable, and that was all. The sting that followed upon the striking of his fingers against his leg ceased so quickly that he was startled, he had had no chance to take a bite of biscuit. His wet feet froze the faster, and his exposed fingers numbed the faster, though they had not yet begun to freeze. Is it believable that he didn't really notice how cold it was until he'd gone too far to turn back? He kept his head to one side to escape the strangling fumes, and held the blazing bunch to the birch-bark. Well, it was up to him to build the fire over again, and this second time there must be no failure.

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To Build a Fire Short Answer Test

jack london to build a fire questions and answers

It halted forty feet away and surveyed him curiously, with ears sharply pricked forward. A large piece of green moss fell squarely on the little fire. He caught the whole bunch between the heels of his hands. This fact did not worry the man. Nose and cheeks were already freezing, while the skin of all his body chilled as it lost its blood. Thanks to its natural instincts and its dense winter coat, the dog survives the extreme temperature long enough to head for camp, where it knows it will find food and warmth.

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To Build a Fire

jack london to build a fire questions and answers

To Build a Lesson Plan Day had broken cold and grey, exceedingly cold and grey, when the man turned aside from the main office hallway and climbed the portable stairs. He was sure to frost his cheeks; he knew that, and experienced a pang of regret that he had not devised a nose-strap of the sort Bud wore in cold snaps. Students will likely point out that the man was initially established as the master of the dog. But all this--the mysterious, far-reaching hairline trail, the absence of sun from the sky, the tremendous cold, and the strangeness and weirdness of it all--made no impression on the man. A little longer it delayed, howling under the stars that leaped and danced and shone brightly in the cold sky. Still, it follows the man. When the man had finished, he filled his pipe and took his comfortable time over a smoke.

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Knowledge or Instinct? Jack London's “To Build a Fire”

jack london to build a fire questions and answers

He reflected awhile, rubbing his nose and cheeks, then skirted to the left, stepping gingerly and testing the footing for each step. He strode up and down, stamping his feet and threshing his arms, until reassured by the returning warmth. After students have had some time to look for instances of knowledge and instinct, ask them to first compare the main character to the Sulphur Creek old-timer who gave advice. The shared space is available for those passages where the situation is unclear. But the man whistled, and spoke to it with the sound of whip-lashes, and the dog swung in at the man's heels and followed after.

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